Tag: reflections

The Poetry Foundation

Like alot of other blogs, this one is verrryy much overdue. One cold snowy February morning in Chicago, when Manahil and Rayyan were off to the zoo with their dad, Ayla and I decided to go to The Poetry Foundation. The Uber dropped us off in front of a giant glass building with no door in sight and we stood there; me shivering, her nicely wrapped in her snowsuit, wondering where exactly to go. Then I saw a small golden plate on the glass building which led me into a glass corridor that emerged into a garden. Yes, it was …

Post-MPR reflections

Post-MPR reflections

Wow, this is long overdue. The MPR was… overwhelming to say the least; the days preceding it, the actual day and the days that came after. Sharing my art and the thought processes behind it, succinctly I might add, was simply nerve-wrecking, and after the MPR was over I felt spent. There was a bout of demotivation that was very unsettling. Previously we had only ever assessed our actions and thoughts out loud during one-on-one tutorials and that hadn’t been scary because we were talking to our advisor. And Jonathan has this way of making you feel like everything you’re …

Just a thought — WIP

So here’s the thing. Creating art is a multi-step process. First, you have to stop imagining and start doing. You have to scale that wall of fear that exists between the perfect piece in your mind, versus the piece (often beyond control) that will appear on the canvas. Then, when you’ve gotten your material and your fear in hand, you need to demonstrate some patience. Yes, you have this urge to see how the final piece will look, but you know that the look you want can not be achieved until you wait for certain layers to dry. Finally, you …

Artist Case Study 1: Antoni Gaudi

After the one-on-one tutorial with Jonathan I was left with plenty of food for thought. One of the ideas that sprung up was that of using trivial, everyday objects to illustrate a deeper narrative. I was inspired by Katherine Mansfield’s writing, where she uses mundane situations and objects to describe a character’s complex thought process. And Jonathan pointed out multiple artists who do the same, for example Jane Wildgoose who has an entire library of objects. Ultimately, it led me to create this piece: When I discussed this piece in the last group critique of the term, Steph said it …

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